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Instructions: Answer all questions up to your child’s current age bracket by answering ‘Yes’ or ‘No’.

Interpretation: If you tick 2 or more boxes with a ‘Yes’  contact Kid Sense Child Development on 1800 KIDSENSE (1800 543 736).

Does your child have difficulty with:

 Age Skill Yes No
 0-6 monthsTracking objects with eyes.
Coordinating suck, swallow, breath sequence, tongue is cupped, forward rhythmical movements of the tongue, and jaw consistently moves up and down in a coordinated pattern.
Sleeping for 4-10 hour intervals.
Communicating hunger, fear or discomfort through crying.
Reaching for nearby objects.
6-12 monthsPlaying for 2-3 minutes with a single toy.
Reaching for nearby objects.
Tracking objects with eyes.
Imitating gestures- Responds to facial expressions.
Identifies self in a mirror.
Sleeping 10-12 hours with only 1 awakening.
Communicating hunger, fear or discomfort through crying.
Tolerating a range of different textured foods.
Drinking from a cup.
Using tongue to move food around mouth.
 1-2 yearsDistinguishing between edible and inedible objects (18 months).
Looking in the right spot for hidden objects.
Playing next to children.
Sitting to look and listen to books being read.
Engaging in imaginative play.
Understanding common dangers of hot objects, stairs, glass.
Imitating gestures – Responds to facial expressions.
Enjoying/tolerating messy play.
Tolerating a range of different textured foods.
Drinking from a cup.
Settling themselves to sleep at night or during the day.
Copying sounds that you make.
Following simple 1 step instructions.
Solving problems with trial and error.
2-3 yearsUsing toilet with assistance and having daytime control.
Has an awareness of a parent’s approval or disapproval of their actions.
Understanding common dangers of hot objects, stairs, glass.
Settling themselves to sleep at night or during the day.
Sitting to look at a book independently.
Expressing emotions.
Distinguishing between edible and inedible objects (18 months).
Tolerating a range of different textured foods.
Engaging in imaginative play.
Paying attention for 3 minutes.
Following simple instructions (e.g. “Give ball to daddy”).
Following 2 part instructions (e.g. “Go to your room and get your shoes”).
Enjoying/tolerating messy play.
Solving problems with trial and error.
Pointing to 5-6 parts of a doll when asked.
Matching circles and squares.
3-4 yearsCounting 1-5.
Has an awareness of a parent’s approval or disapproval of their actions.
Understanding common dangers of hot objects, stairs, glass.
Expressing emotions.
Settling themselves to sleep at night or during the day.
Remembering most colours.
Choosing weather appropriate clothes.
Differentiating between real and pretend world.
Taking turns.
Playing with 2 or 3 children in a group.
Play themes expand beyond personal experience (e.g. fireman rescuing people).
Enjoying/tolerating messy play.
Dressing self (only requiring assistance with laces, buttons, and other fasteners in awkward places).
Tolerating different clothing textures, seams, tags etc.
Feeding self without difficulty.
Pointing to 5-6 parts of a doll when asked.
Coping in busy/noisy environments.
4-5 yearsCounting 1-10.
Settling themselves to sleep at night.
Naming shapes.
Developing friendships.
Expressing emotions.
Following rules.
Sitting to pay attention e.g. mat time.
Coping in noisy/busy environments.
Choosing weather appropriate clothes.
Dressing self independently.
Feeding self without difficulty.
Taking turns.
Playing with 4 or 5 children in a group.
Tolerating different clothing textures, seams, tags etc.
 5-6 yearsWriting numbers and letters.
Writing simple sentences.
Feeding self without difficulty.
Expressing emotions.
Recalling events and describing them.
Remembering a sentence to write that was just thought about or told.
Distinguishing between left and right.
Categorizing objects: “These are toys; these are books”.
Understanding concepts like yesterday, today, and tomorrow.
Copying complex shapes, such as a diamond.
Sounding out simple words like “hang”, “neat”, “jump” and “sank”.
Sitting at a desk, following teacher instructions, and independently doing simple in-class assignments.
Knowing where their body is in time and space to coordinate body movements for ball skills.
Feeding self without difficulty.
Tolerating different clothing textures, seams, tags etc.
Coping in busy/noisy environments.
Settling independently for sleep.
6-7 yearsForming numbers and letters correctly.
Independently getting herself to sleep and sleeping through the night.
Eating a range of food and tolerating different textures.
Recognising others’ perspective.
Recalling events and describing them.
Expressing emotions.
Remembering a sentence to write that was just thought about or told.
Attending for longer periods of time.
Sitting still (e.g. in class, at mealtimes etc).
Independently toileting during the day and at night.
Coping in busy/noisy environments.
Understanding fractions and the concept of space.
Understanding money.
Taking on more responsibilities e.g. chores.
Naming months and days of week in order.
Telling the time.
Reading a book on their own.
Feeding self without difficulty.
Knowing where their body is in time and space to coordinate body movements for ball skills.
Playing with 4 or 5 children in a group.
Inhibiting the need to talk and ask questions.
7-8 yearsForming numbers and letters correctly.
Recognising others’ perspective.
Recalling events and describing them.
Expressing emotions.
Remembering a sentence to write that was just thought about or told.
Attending for longer periods of time.
Sitting still (e.g. in class, at mealtimes etc).
Coping in busy/noisy environments.
Understanding fractions and the concept of space.
Taking on more responsibilities e.g. chores.
Understanding money.
Telling the time.
Naming months and days of week in order.
Reading a book on their own.
Knowing where their body is in time and space to coordinate body movements for ball skills.
Inhibiting the need to talk and ask questions.

 

This checklist was designed to serve as a functional screening of developmental skills per age group.  It does not constitute an assessment nor reflect strictly standardised research.

The information in this checklist was compiled over many years from a variety of sources. This information was then further shaped by years of clinical practice as well as therapeutic consultation with child care, kindergarten and school teachers in South Australia about the developmental skills necessary for children to meet the demands of these educational environments. In more recent years, it has been further modified by the need for children and their teachers to meet the functional Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) requirements that are not always congruent with standardised research.